Queen's University

 

ENIN 205/3.0

 

Course Introduction:

"More and more companies are looking for skill sets that are both arts/creativity-related and science/math-related. They seek talented individuals who can brainstorm, problem-solve, collaborate creatively and contribute/communicate new ideas."
— The Conference Board and The American Association of School Administrators, Ready to Innovate Report

“People from technology don't understand the creative process that these companies go through to make their products, and they don't appreciate how hard it is. And the creative companies don't appreciate how creative technology is; they think it's just something you buy. So there is a gulf of understanding between the two."
— Steve Jobs, Wall Street Journal

“The greatest enterprise of the mind has always been and always will be the attempted linkage of the sciences and the arts."
— Edmund Wilson, Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge

Because some of the very best ideas emerge at the intersection of technology and the humanities, this course seeks to bridge disciplinary divides and leverage the power of diverse perspectives to unlock fresh ways of knowing. The course welcomes students from any background to collaborate and explore the overlapping practices, paradigms, and points of divergence between the arts and STEM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics).

A “STEAM” approach combines what may at first appear to be opposite methods and processes, by emphasizing the importance of creativity, collaboration, and critical analysis to art and science. Students will explore and create a range of concepts, cases, models, and applications for innovation across creative and scientific sectors. In the process they will develop their skills in ideational thinking, which is the capacity to generate and combine ideas from a variety of perspectives into new and unique configurations.


Course Design & Delivery:

This is an online-only course offering. Students will be provided with a number of learning resources including online readings, video lectures, webinars, case studies, templates and exemplars, group discussions, individual and group exercises, and online office hours. To complete these assignments, students will use the learning management system, the university library website, and a series of free, cloud-based collaboration and communication tools.  


Teaching and Learning Outcomes:

This is a practical, project-based course that will help students develop their critical thinking, collaborative engagement, and clear communication skills. It will also be an opportunity for a diverse group of students to collectively flex and hone their creativity, multimedia digital literacies, and creative competencies.

To meet these learning goals, we have designed activities and assessments that, by the end of the course, will equip students with the necessary knowledge and skills to understand and analyze the role of innovation across STEAM sectors and to take action themselves, including:

✔︎ Conducting ethnographic and observational field research using multimodal documentation methods

✔︎ Executing digital and visual communication and computational skills while assembling a range of creative deliverables that demonstrate learning

✔︎ Practicing the intellectual flexibility to examine problems from multiple points of view, including the perspective of the user, audience, or client

✔︎ Assessing and experiencing the power of collaboration and other team-approaches to the innovation process

✔︎ Executing a disciplined approach to individual and group brainstorming that leads to actionable ideas and insights and improves problem-solving skills

✔︎ Utilizing a working understanding of strategies and methods applicable to the stages of the innovation process across a breadth of STEAM disciplines

Co-authored by two instructors and delivered online over six weeks, in this course we’ll review principles, approaches, methods and theories useful for building and communicating innovative solutions for difficult technical and creative problems alike.


Instructors:

 

Dr. James McLellan has served as Head of the Chemical Engineering department for the periods July 2006 - June 2011 and July 2012 - June 2017. He is also cross-appointed to Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to The Dan School of Drama and Music. Jim McLellan is the Academic Lead of the Dunin-Desphpande Queen’s Innovation Centre, and founder of the Queen’s Summer Innovation Initiative.

Dr. Sidneyeve Matrix is a Queen’s National Scholar and Associate Professor in The Dan School of Drama and Music. She teaches courses on design thinking, digital communications, entrepreneurship and creativity. Dr. Matrix also teaches in the Arts Leadership Graduate Program, the Smith School of Business Masters of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Program, and serves on the Dunin-Deshpande Queen's Innovation Centre Executive Team.


Course Design:

Offered online each summer starting in 2018, this condensed course involves a combination of lectures, open-source learning objects (readings/videos/tools), hands-on research and design activities, collaborative live webinars, and guest lectures from arts and science, academia, and industry. Students will have opportunities to work independently and in teams as we explore topics such as:

  • Embracing a Growth Mindset: Can Creativity and Entrepreneurship be Taught?
  • Brainstorming and Idea Generation: Combining Convergent and Divergent Thinking
  • User Experience Design: Building High-Tech and High-Touch Intuitive Interfaces
  • Navigating Complex Relationships Between the Concrete and the Abstract
  • The Power of Empathy to Drive Innovation: Doing Creative Observation Research

 

Learning Hours: 120 (84 Online +36 Private Study)

This is an online-only course offering. Students will be provided with a number of learning resources including online readings, video lectures, webinars, case studies, templates and exemplars, group discussions, individual and group exercises, and online office hours. To complete these assignments, students will use the learning management system, the university library website, and a series of free, cloud-based collaboration and communication tools.  


Launches: Spring 2018

Prerequisite: Level 2 or above (in other words, you need to be at least a second-year student)